Second Chance Wildlife Rehabilitation



“Until we extend the circle of our compassion to all

living things, we will not find peace.”

Albert Schweitzer

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“Until we extend the circle of our compassion to all living things, we will not find peace.”

Albert Schweitzer


Raccoons are excellent mothers. If you have disturbed an adult raccoon and see it run away from a baby or her den do not disturb the baby, mother will return at night to continue caring for her babies. Sometimes babies stray a short distance from the den. Mother will retrieve it as soon as she sees it has strayed.


When the babies are 8-10 weeks old, mother will take them out of the birth den and they will not return. Sometimes this takes more than one night to accomplish. If you find that there is only one or two left, be patient. She will return to continue the move the next night. If she does not return, contact a rehabilitator.


A mother raccoon will put her babies in separate places once they are out of the nest. You may think the baby is orphaned, but is probably just waiting for his mother to return at night. If possible, watch for the mother raccoon to return at night. If the mother doesn’t return, call a licensed rehabilitator.


    To determine if the baby raccoon needs help, answer these questions.

     

Are there obvious signs of injury such as wounds, bleeding, shivering, discharge from nose, eyes or mouth?

Was there known or suspected contact with a cat or dog?

Is the raccoon weak and uncoordinated?

Is the raccoon approaching people or pets?

Is the raccoon crying?


If the answer to any of these is yes, then contact a rehabilitator immediately. Do Not attempt to feed it or give it water.



Raccoons